Nursing homes try to keep residents safe during COVID-19 outbreaks

Andy Hershberger

Nursing homes have been the source of several outbreaks of the coronavirus in New Hampshire, and officials are struggling with how to keep residents safe.>> Download the free WMUR appNine deaths related to COVID-19 were reported Friday, and all were patients in New Hampshire long-term care facilities, officials said.”Unfortunately, this virus is just uncommonly deadly to the elderly wherever they might be found, whether they’re in the home-care setting or a facility-based setting,” said Brendan William, president of the New Hampshire Health Care Association.Officials at The Residence at Salem Woods said that in April, nine of 10 people who died in their memory care unit tested positive for COVID-19, Five of them were already in hospice.State officials said while the number of COVID-19 cases in the general public are trending down, they continue to rise in long-term care facilities.”Everything that we knew about long-term care facilities has evolved in the last two months, and our initial guidance two months ago was to only test people who were symptomatic, and we did that for a week and said, ‘That’s not going to work,'” said Lori Shibinette, commissioner of the Department of Health and Human Services.Shibinette said health workers continue to test and re-test staff members and outfit them with as much personal protective equipment as they can find.”We’re even finding when we go in and test in these long-term care facilities that we have people that are asymptomatic and are testing positive, so that’s the challenge with this virus,” said Anna Thomas, of the Manchester Public Health Department. “There’s a lot we’re still learning every single day.”William said there is also going to be an enormous mental impact on nursing home residents caused by the isolation brought by the virus.** Town-by-town COVID-19 case data: Interactive map | Text-only list **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

Nursing homes have been the source of several outbreaks of the coronavirus in New Hampshire, and officials are struggling with how to keep residents safe.

>> Download the free WMUR app

Nine deaths related to COVID-19 were reported Friday, and all were patients in New Hampshire long-term care facilities, officials said.

“Unfortunately, this virus is just uncommonly deadly to the elderly wherever they might be found, whether they’re in the home-care setting or a facility-based setting,” said Brendan William, president of the New Hampshire Health Care Association.

Officials at The Residence at Salem Woods said that in April, nine of 10 people who died in their memory care unit tested positive for COVID-19, Five of them were already in hospice.

State officials said while the number of COVID-19 cases in the general public are trending down, they continue to rise in long-term care facilities.

“Everything that we knew about long-term care facilities has evolved in the last two months, and our initial guidance two months ago was to only test people who were symptomatic, and we did that for a week and said, ‘That’s not going to work,'” said Lori Shibinette, commissioner of the Department of Health and Human Services.

Shibinette said health workers continue to test and re-test staff members and outfit them with as much personal protective equipment as they can find.

“We’re even finding when we go in and test in these long-term care facilities that we have people that are asymptomatic and are testing positive, so that’s the challenge with this virus,” said Anna Thomas, of the Manchester Public Health Department. “There’s a lot we’re still learning every single day.”

William said there is also going to be an enormous mental impact on nursing home residents caused by the isolation brought by the virus.

** Town-by-town COVID-19 case data: Interactive map | Text-only list **

Andy Hershberger


Source link

You May Also Like

About the Author: Andy Hershberger

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The maximum upload file size: 10 MB. You can upload: image, audio, video, document, spreadsheet, interactive, other. Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded.