The Latest: Moscow eases lockdown rules

By The Associated Press

A waiter, wearing a mouth mask to protect against the spread of coronavirus, carries tables as he sets up a restaurant terrace at the Grand Place during the partial lifting of coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown regulations in Brussels, Monday, June 8, 2020. less
A waiter, wearing a mouth mask to protect against the spread of coronavirus, carries tables as he sets up a restaurant terrace at the Grand Place during the partial lifting of coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown ... more

Photo: Francisco Seco, AP

Photo: Francisco Seco, AP

A waiter, wearing a mouth mask to protect against the spread of coronavirus, carries tables as he sets up a restaurant terrace at the Grand Place during the partial lifting of coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown regulations in Brussels, Monday, June 8, 2020. less
A waiter, wearing a mouth mask to protect against the spread of coronavirus, carries tables as he sets up a restaurant terrace at the Grand Place during the partial lifting of coronavirus COVID-19 lockdown ... more

Photo: Francisco Seco, AP

The Latest: Moscow eases lockdown rules

MOSCOW — The Russian capital is ending a tight lockdown that has been in place for more than two months, citing a slowdown in the coronavirus outbreak.

Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin said that starting Tuesday residents will no longer be required to obtain electronic passes for travel and can walk, use public transport and drive without any restrictions.

Hairdressers and beauty salons will be allowed to reopen Tuesday, and cafes and restaurants will be able to open outdoor terraces starting June 16.

Under the lockdown imposed in late March, all nonessential businesses were closed and residents were only allowed to shop at nearby stores and pharmacies, visit doctors and walk their dogs.

The restrictions have been gradually eased. Industrial plants and construction sites were allowed to start working on May 12 and non-food retailers were permitted to reopen last Monday.

The number of daily infections in Moscow has dropped from a peak of about 6,700 to about 2,000 recently. Overall, Russia has registered over 476,000 infections, the world’s third-highest caseload after the United States and Brazil, including 5,971 deaths.

Moscow has accounted for nearly half of the nation’s infections and coronavirus deaths. Many of Russia’s 85 regions already have eased their lockdowns.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Worldwide virus deaths pass 400,000, according to Johns Hopkins tally.

— New Zealand says it has eradicated the virus.

— India eases lockdown even as virus cases jump in capital.

— Coronavirus disrupts global fight to save endangered species.

— Britain faces criticism for another sudden change in its advice on face masks: all hospital staff in England will wear surgical face masks beginning June 15 while visitors will need some sort of face covering.

— While seasonal colds and the flu spread through NFL locker rooms most years, many players polled by The Associated Press say they’re scared to return to work without a vaccine for the coronavirus.

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Go to https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak for updates throughout the day.

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING TODAY:

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YEREVAN, Armenia — Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinian says he and his family have recovered from the coronavirus.

Pashinian said on Facebook that he and his family members tested negative Monday for a second time in as many days.

Pashinian announced that he was infected a week ago, adding that he probably contracted the virus from a waiter who brought him a glass a water at a meeting without wearing gloves and later tested positive for the virus.

Armenia has so far reported over 13,000 infections, including 211 deaths, among its population of nearly 3 million.

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DHAKA, Bangladesh — China has sent a 10-member team of physicians to Bangladesh to help hospitals and doctors fight coronavirus as the South Asian nation’s total infections are nearing 70,000.

The team consists of 10 respiratory physicians selected by the Hainan Provincial Health Commission in China, according to the Chinese Embassy in Dhaka.

Bangladeshi Foreign Minister A.K. Abdul Momen was in Dhaka’s international airport to receive the team. He said the country was seeking “cooperation and partnership” to deal with the pandemic.

On Monday, the Health Directorate’s senior official said another 42 people died of coronavirus and 2,735 people were infected in the previous 24-hour period, raising the total infections to 68,504.

A total of 930 people have died since the first positive case was confirmed on March 8.

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NICOSIA, Cyprus — Cypriot officials are warning against undue complacency in enforcing social distancing rules after video emerged of an open-air nightclub at a popular seaside resort jam-packed with patrons.

Cyprus police spokesman Christos Andreou told The Associated Press on Monday that the nightclub’s owner faces a charge of flouting maximum capacity limits set out under a Health Ministry order.

Andreou said police are taking the owner to court because he was repeatedly warned over the weekend not to exceed the allowable capacity. Andreou said police will also seek a court order to temporarily shut down the Ayia Napa establishment.

Justice Minister George Savvides posted on his official Twitter account on Sunday that the nightclub acted “inconceivably irresponsibly” for the sake of profit.

Earlier, Health Minister Constantinos Ioannou also tweeted that such behavior could make a return to lockdown measures “inevitable.”

Cyprus is eager to get its key tourism sector back on track after a two-month lockdown, but officials say they won’t allow anyone to cut corners on what they need to do to protect against the spread of COVID-19.

Commercial flights from a limited number of countries resume on Tuesday. Cyprus has lifted almost all restrictions, but a ban on indoor bar and nightclub openings remains in force.

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MOSCOW — Russia says it will partially reopen the country’s borders as the country eases coronavirus restrictions.

Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin said Monday that traveling abroad for the purposes of work, studying, receiving medical treatment or taking care of relatives will be allowed. He said Russia will let in foreigners seeking medical treatment or taking care of family members.

It wasn’t immediately clear when the partial reopening of the borders would go into effect.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters there is “no set date” yet for resuming international flights, which were halted in late March.

Last month, President Vladimir Putin called for gradual lifting of lockdown restrictions, saying that Russia was able to slow down the epidemic.

The country’s health officials, however, have been reporting around 9,000 new infections daily since mid May and some experts are concerned that easing lockdown restrictions may be premature.

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LONDON — Travelers to Britain are now being required to go into quarantine for two weeks — a sweeping measure meant to halt the further spread of COVID-19.

Starting Monday, all passengers will be asked to fill in a form detailing where they will self-isolate, with only a few exceptions. Those who fail to comply with the quarantine rules could be fined.

Ryanair chief executive Michael O’Leary says the quarantine will cause “untold devastation” for the country’s tourism industry — not just on the airlines.

He told the BBC that hotels, visitor attractions and restaurants will also be hurt, and thousands of jobs will be lost.

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ATHENS, Greece — Bars, nightclubs and internet cafes are allowed to reopen from Monday in Greece, where an early lockdown is credited with keeping the number of coronavirus deaths and serious illnesses at low levels.

Nearly all lockdown measures have now been lifted in a phased reopening, with regulations in place for businesses to maintain limits on the number of customers allowed and distances to be maintained.

Most bars, nightclubs and restaurants operate outdoors in Greece during the summer months, which has helped authorities in allowing their reopening.

However, government and health authorities warn local lockdowns could be imposed if violations in social distancing regulations lead to outbreaks.

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NEW DELHI — India is reopening its restaurants, shopping malls and religious places in most states even as the number of coronavirus cases and deaths in the country grows.

The Health Ministry reported another 9,983 cases Monday, raising India’s count past 256,000 to fifth most in the world. The 206 fatalities reported Monday were the highest single-day rise and takes the country’s death toll to 7,135.

New Delhi is also reopening its state borders, allowing interstate movement of people and goods.

India already partially restored train services and domestic flights and allowed shops and manufacturing to reopen.

Schools remain closed.

The number of new cases has soared since the government began relaxing restrictions. There has also been a surge in infections in India’s vast countryside following the return of hundreds of thousands of migrant workers who left cities and towns after losing their jobs.

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ISLAMABAD — The number of new coronavirus infections in Pakistan continued to spiral upward, as thenation of 220 million people surpassed 100,000 cases as of Monday with more than 2,000 deaths.

The daily infection rate spiked after the Islamic holy month of Ramadan ended and markets were thrown open during the Eid-al Fitr holiday at the end of May. That followed the government refusing to close mosques and deciding to open up the country even as medical professionals pleaded for a stricter lockdown,

Since then the daily infection rates have held fairly steady with just under 5,000 new cases each day. Testing has held steady in recent days at about 22,000 each day, with government officials saying Pakistan aimed to eventually carry out 30,000 tests every day.

Prime Minister Imran Khan has gone on national television to tell Pakistanis the country’s poorest cannot survive a strict lockdown.

The International Monetary fund and the Asian Development Bank have both give Pakistan millions of dollars in bridge loans to ease the economic impact of the pandemic pummeling economies worldwide.

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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Data from the New Mexico Health Department shows COVID-19 infections among health care workers in the state have spiked as intensive care units remain full and nurses and first responders call for more protective equipment.

The data shows 492 workers were diagnosed in May, marking a 219% increase from the 154 workers who had tested positive for the coronavirus the month before.

Human Services Secretary David Scrase told the Albuquerque Journal that the increase was expected.

The largest increase came in Bernalillo County — home to three of the state’s COVID-19 hub hospitals. San Juan and McKinley counties also had surges.

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JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesia’s capital of Jakarta, the city hardest hit by the new coronavirus, has partly reopened after two months of partial lockdown as the world’s fourth most populous nation braces to gradually reopen its economy.

The city of 11 million people, with a total of 30 million in its greater metropolitan area, has been under large-scale social restrictions since April 10.

Jakarta Gov. Anies Baswedan announced that all worship facilities will be allowed to reopen with half their capacity and social distancing measures on Friday, followed by offices, restaurants and grocery stores that begin to resume activities with only 50% of their employees and clients on Monday. The measure also applies to public transportation.

Schools are closed during this month’s transition phase to the so-called “new normal,” while some shopping centres, zoo and beaches will open their doors next week.

But the major transport and industrial hub has now signalled the end of its isolation, with social media showing long lines of travelers queued at train stations, many ignoring social distancing rules.

Jakarta, the first large city to enforce a partial lockdown in the country, has recorded more than 8,033 confirmed cases with 529 deaths. Nationwide, there’s been 31,186 infections and 1,851 fatalities.

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WELLINGTON, New Zealand — New Zealand has eradicated the coronavirus from its shores after health officials reported that the final person known to have contracted an infection had recovered.

It has been 17 days since the last new case was reported in New Zealand, and Monday also marked the first time since late February that there have been no active cases. Health officials caution that new cases could be imported into the country, which has closed its borders to everybody but citizens and residents, with some exceptions.

Director-General of Health Ashley Bloomfield said it was a pleasing development.

“Having no active cases for the first time since February 28 is certainly a significant mark in our journey but as we’ve previously said, ongoing vigilance against COVID-19 will continue to be essential,” Bloomfield said.

Experts say a number of factors have helped the nation of 5 million wipe out the disease, including its isolated location, along with leadership shown by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, who imposed a strict lockdown early on during the outbreak. Just over 1,500 people contracted the virus in New Zealand, including 22 who died.

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SEOUL, South Korea -- South Korea has reported 38 new cases of COVID-19 as infections continue to rise in the densely populated capital area.

The figures by South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday brought national totals to 11,814 cases and 273 deaths.

All but four of the new cases came from the Seoul metropolitan area, where about half of South Korea’s 51 million people live, as officials scramble to stem transmissions linked to e-commerce workers, door-to-door sellers and people who went out amid loosened social distancing.

Health Minister Park Neunghoo, during a virus meeting, called for officials to examine the supplies of test equipment in case infections continue to increase. He also called for education officials to double-check preventive measures with millions of children returning to school.

Classes on Monday were reopened for around 1.3 million middle-school freshmen and fifth- and sixth-grade elementary school kids in the last stage of a phased reopening of schools, which began with high school seniors on May 13.

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Follow AP pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak


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