University of Cincinnati, UC Health expand clinical trials for COVID-19 treatments

First, it was a specialized plasma, and now the University of Cincinnati and UC Health doctors are expanding clinical trials hoping to pave the path to test vaccines against COVID-19.Doctors said as many as 30 clinical trials are under consideration.They said not all of the clinical trials will happen, but one new trial includes testing an antiviral compound against COVID-19."I'd be shocked if we don't have a major contribution to make here for the national and international community," Dr. Brett Kissela said.Kissela is a University of Cincinnati professor and a UC Health physician focused on finding treatment for COVID-19 patients through numerous clinical trials.He expects doctors will be working four to six clinical trials in about a week."When we do these careful studies, where we take people and we randomly assign them to the drug or to a placebo or a sugar pill, that's the only way we can tell," Kissela said. "If we're blinded to what they got and the patients are blinded, then we really know the answer when we look at the data. We're not biased by something."He said some studies will go deeper into how much COVID-19 convalescent plasma is needed for treatment.Kissela said they'll also study the drug hydroxychloroquine and its effect on COVID-19, as well as start a trial with an antiviral compound that attacks the virus in the nose and lungs.UC officials said they'll run another trial with a drug that treats a rare lung disease, to try to regulate the immune system's potentially organ-damaging response to COVID-19."The next thing is prevention right and how to give vaccines. As new vaccines are developed, we'll have a lot, we'll see a lot of that coming in the weeks, to months, to years to follow and testing those vaccines to see if they really work safely," Kissela said.Doctors WLWT talked with said Cincinnati Children's Hospital and the VA Medical Center are part of this academic mission.They said they will be watching for safety, side effects and effectiveness.Doctors ask anyone with COVID-19 or who has recovered from COVID-19 and is interested in learning more about these studies to contact UCcovidresearch@uchealth.com or call 513-245-3417.

First, it was a specialized plasma, and now the University of Cincinnati and UC Health doctors are expanding clinical trials hoping to pave the path to test vaccines against COVID-19.

Doctors said as many as 30 clinical trials are under consideration.

They said not all of the clinical trials will happen, but one new trial includes testing an antiviral compound against COVID-19.

"I'd be shocked if we don't have a major contribution to make here for the national and international community," Dr. Brett Kissela said.

Kissela is a University of Cincinnati professor and a UC Health physician focused on finding treatment for COVID-19 patients through numerous clinical trials.

He expects doctors will be working four to six clinical trials in about a week.

"When we do these careful studies, where we take people and we randomly assign them to the drug or to a placebo or a sugar pill, that's the only way we can tell," Kissela said. "If we're blinded to what they got and the patients are blinded, then we really know the answer when we look at the data. We're not biased by something."

He said some studies will go deeper into how much COVID-19 convalescent plasma is needed for treatment.

Kissela said they'll also study the drug hydroxychloroquine and its effect on COVID-19, as well as start a trial with an antiviral compound that attacks the virus in the nose and lungs.

UC officials said they'll run another trial with a drug that treats a rare lung disease, to try to regulate the immune system's potentially organ-damaging response to COVID-19.

"The next thing is prevention right and how to give vaccines. As new vaccines are developed, we'll have a lot, we'll see a lot of that coming in the weeks, to months, to years to follow and testing those vaccines to see if they really work safely," Kissela said.

Doctors WLWT talked with said Cincinnati Children's Hospital and the VA Medical Center are part of this academic mission.

They said they will be watching for safety, side effects and effectiveness.

Doctors ask anyone with COVID-19 or who has recovered from COVID-19 and is interested in learning more about these studies to contact UCcovidresearch@uchealth.com or call 513-245-3417.


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